Our new truffle market — Part I

Daglan is about to launch a new market — one featuring the summer truffle, or tuber aestivum, also known as the burgundy truffle. (Evidently the summer truffle and burgundy truffle are somewhat different looking, with different growing seasons, but science has proven that they are, deep down, the same species.) In fact, the start for our market is tomorrow (Sunday, June 3) at 11 a.m.

Here’s a bit of background on the summer truffle, which I’ve lifted from Wikipedia:

The flavor, size and color of summer truffles …  is similar to that of burgundy truffles, but their aroma is less intense and the flesh … is a paler hazel color.

As their name suggests, summer truffles are harvested earlier than burgundy truffles, from May to August. They are most often found in the southern part of the distribution area of the species, notably in the Mediterranean climate area of France, Italy and Spain.

To publicize the new event, the village has put up this large sign above a parking area just as you enter Daglan, after crossing the Pont Neuf:

The sign as you enter Daglan.

And this sign was hung high above the Place de la Liberté, our main square. It points out that the actual market will be held in the courtyard of our elementary school, which lies between the Mairie (Mayor’s Office) and La Cantine, the restaurant of Fabrice (Le Chef) Lemonnier. We intend to be there, and will report on how the launch went. We will also, on a day to be determined, be making truffle butter. More on that later as well.


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This entry was posted in Food, French food, Life in southwest France, Markets in France and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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