Walking among the hunters

We’re now in hunting season, and I have to say that hunters in the Greater Daglan Area seem to be a fairly responsible bunch. They always hold their rifles and shotguns carefully, and I’ve never seen one riding through our village on horseback, yelling “Yahoo!” and firing into the air. (Phew.)

On the other hand, I wouldn’t want to get between a hunter and a running deer that he was tracking.

So naturally I was a bit nervous yesterday afternoon as I set out on my usual one-kilometre stroll with Nordic walking poles. As I started off,  I realized that I would have to walk right past two older gentlemen who were armed with rifles, standing in a clear patch under a small grove of walnut trees, while waiting for their dogs to flush some game down from the hills.

The scene was the back road,  or cycle path if you prefer, that runs north from Daglan to St. Cybranet. It’s where I park my car and then walk a measured 500 metres, turn around, and walk back to the car. This is part of my exercise regime as I attempt to recover fully from the major back surgery I had in April.

It was easy to see that I would have to pass directly next to the hunters, because they always wear bright orange safety vests. So you can spot them from quite a distance.

As I approached, I could hear their dogs barking, high above us on the forested hill. I nodded politely and and wished the hunters  a good day and good luck with la chasse, and silently hoped that the dogs wouldn’t come charging down the hill any time soon, baying at a deer. All went well.

On the return trip, back to the car, I had to pass them again, of course. This time, the baying of the dogs was even louder, and soon after I passed the hunters, I heard what sounded like a gun being cocked. Gulp.

In the end, no shots were fired, and I was back at my car safe and sound.

And in case you’re wondering why there are no photos with this posting, it’s because I didn’t think it seemed very politic to pull out a camera and start shooting pictures. After all, the hunters weren’t shooting at me.

 

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This entry was posted in Exercise and fitness, Life in southwest France, Walking in the Dordogne and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Walking among the hunters

  1. D2 says:

    http://www.aliexpress.com/item/New-Christmas-decoration-Brown-party-supplies-Reindeer-Antler-Santa-Hat-Christmas-hat-hoop-free-shipping/1196649777.html

    Donna and I were just about to send you and Jan this holiday gift. Perhaps matching orange jackets would be a better idea.

  2. Samandjill Hershfield says:

    Lorenzo, I can’t imagine why you were worried.

    [Dear readers: This is supposed to be a photo of me wearing antlers, but it seems that the technology didn’t work, so it doesn’t appear. Please use your imagination.]

    Sam the Sham​

  3. loren24250 says:

    I know — silly me!

    €‹

  4. John Ison says:

    Hunting season in France must move from north to south as it was hunting season in Bourgogne in late October when we were visiting. We saw several parties and they were always well marked, including little road signs. So, I guess they don’t accidentally shoot each other, just unmarked walkers! I felt France was too densely populated to allow hunting but any excuse for a good meal.

    • loren24250 says:

      I understand why you’d think France is too densely populated for hunting, and I guess I’ve had a similar view. On the other hand, as you drive around rural France — here in the Dordogne, or in the neighbouring department of the Lot — you realize how rural/agricultural/forested much of the country is. In other words, perfect for hunting.

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