We go all arty

In yesterday’s posting, I showed you the new banner that’s promoting Daglan’s Exposition d’Art, which includes paintings, sculpture, and photography. Last night my wife Jan and I went to the show’s grand opening — and I think most of the rest of the population did too. Frankly, I was surprised at the turnout, and quite happy about it too.

Here’s the entrance to the exhibit, at the salle des fêtes, or community hall:

Coming into the hall.

Coming into the hall.

The show was to open at 7 p.m., and we drove into the parking lot about 7:15, and by then the lot was almost full. Here are a few photographs of people admiring the art, starting with a woman (in the lower right of the photo) who was taking her time studying the woman in the painting:

A woman (lower right) ponders the woman in the painting.

A woman (lower right) ponders the woman in the painting.

Here’s another female visitor, walking along a row of paintings; at the far right in the photo is one of the paintings I particularly liked:

Checking out the paintings.

Checking out the paintings.

And here’s a close-up of the painting I liked (in part, perhaps, because it reminded me of my early years on the beaches of Florida’s west coast):

Painting of an old beached boat under a tree.

Painting of an old beached boat under a tree.

After several minutes of wandering through the hall, chatting with neighbours and checking out the art, the group was called to order and assembled for the inevitable speeches:

The crowd lines up for the speeches.

The crowd lines up for the speeches.

With those formalities out of the way, it was back to reviewing the art. One of my favourite groupings was the work of a sculptor who had some obvious fun with caricatures of French Presidents — current and former — using ceramics and various found items. Here is his version of M. Sarkozy, which as you can see from the woman at the left rear of the photo, caused a few chuckles:

The artist's impression of France's immediate past President.

The artist’s impression of France’s immediate past President.

And here’s the sculptor’s take on another former President, Jacques Chirac:

The artist's impression of Jacques Chirac.

The artist’s impression of Jacques Chirac.

And last but not least, the sculptor’s impression of our current President, François Hollande — complete with a rose in his mouth and a Caisse à outils Suisse around his neck (which means a carrying case or box of “Swiss tools”).  Maybe, just maybe, the artist is saying that the President makes flowery statements and promises, but then uses Swiss “tools” like austerity to manage the economy. But I’m not sure.

The President of France, equipped with his tool box -- and a rose in his mouth.

The President of France, equipped with his tool box — and a rose in his mouth.

Once I had finished my tour of all the art, it was time to head home. But first I had to navigate my car out of the parking lot and past the crowd lined up for the drinks and snacks; it wasn’t easy.

Stimulated by all the art, and ready for a drink and a snack.

Stimulated by all the art, and ready for a drink and a snack.

The exhibition continues through August 12, and admission is free. So if you’re in the Greater Daglan Area, or will be soon, it’s worth having a look.

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