It’s the bells

We live near the church in the centre of the village, and the church bells are a constant source of wonder. For 24 hours a day, every day, they tell the time. On the hour, the bell rings the number of the hour. Then, a minute or so later, it rings the same number again. On the half hour, the bell rings once, and only once. Whether it’s 6 a.m. or 6 p.m., the bell will sound six times. Then, a minute or so later, it will ring six times again. But three times a day, the rhythm changes, because at 7 a.m. , at noon, and at 7 p.m., we hear what we call the crazy bells. First there is the ringing of the bell to tell the time; then again, a minute or so later. But then, a minute or so after that, the bells go crazy, and just ring and ring. Evidently this is fairly common for church bells in Europe, as they are ringing the faithful to church. You might think the noise is hard to cope with, especially when you’re trying to sleep. But it’s not. For some reason, we sleep through all the ringing. And if you do wake up in the middle of the night, it’s kind of comforting to wait for the bells to chime.

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6 Responses to It’s the bells

  1. Ray Edamura says:

    Thanks Loren! I’ve subscribed to your blog using RSS so that it shows up in Outlook. I’m looking forward to hearing about your progress in France.

  2. I’d love to see those bells.

  3. Rob says:

    I think you need to create a contrata version of the canonical hours for each chiming, especially the 7 & 7 ringings. Like “Vespers” and “Matins,” but for bon vivants like yourselves. Perhaps “caffins” in the morning to go with your espresso, and “lilets” or “pernods” in the evening at aperitif hour.

  4. Alix says:

    yep….been there …heard them….
    Actually remembering waiting impatiently for the crazy bells to stop…then enjoyed anticipating them each time for some reason!? I think it is meant to brainwash the listener into returning to Daglan again…

  5. Pingback: 2010 in review | Radio Free Daglan

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